Posts Tagged ‘Russell Maret’

Russell Maret at Codex 2011

Thursday, February 24th, 2011

At the Codex Book Fair in Berkeley this month, Russell Maret and photographer Annie Schlechter show Æthelwold Etc.(2011), and Prometheus Bound (2007), the tragedy of Aeschylus translated by Henri David Thoreau with smoke drawings by Maret.

A Roman Inscription on Santi Giovanni e Paolo al Celio (2010) by Maret, with photographs by Schlechter.

Maret, a self-described “alphabetical fetishist,” shows pages from his newest book,  Æthelwold Etc. at Codex.

russellmaret.com

russellmaret.blogspot.com

annieschlechter.com

~Suzanne Ahearne

Russell Maret elected new NA FPBA Chair

Thursday, September 30th, 2010

RussellMaret
Russell Maret explains something on the Codex 2009 show floor.

At a telephone meeting held on September 25, the North American board of directors selected Russell Maret for a new 3-year term as Chair. He will serve until 2013, and replaces Robert McCamant, whose term is expiring.

In addition, the board elected McCamant as Treasurer and Bob Baris and Spencer Timm as new board members. Previous officer David Moyer opted to renew as Recording Secretary, while Stephen Heaver and Mark McMurray renewed as board members. Sean Donnelly remains until 2012 as Membership Secretary, and additional board members with their year of term expiration include Jeffrey Cooper ’11, Robert Fleck ’11, Lee Harrer ’11, Peter Koch ’12, Michael McGarvey ’12, L.D. Mitchell ’12, Abigail Rorer ’12, Katherine Ruffin ’11, Michael Russem ’12, Wilbur “Chip” Schilling ’12, and Jane Siegel ’12.

Russell Maret, FPBA Annual Meeting, October 3

Friday, June 11th, 2010

The FPBA announces that its annual meeting will be held Sunday morning, October 3, during Oak Knoll Fest in New Castle, Delaware. In addition to a brief business meeting, the featured speaker will be Russell Maret, talking on “Visionaries & Fanatics: Thoughts on Type Design and the Private Press.” He will discuss his recent investigations (in Rome) into letter design and historical recurrence and how they relate to private press publishing in the early 20th and 21st centuries.

This scene is from his Open Studio at the end of his sojourn in Rome.
–Bob McCamant

Russell Maret presents the fruits of his Roman alphabetical investigations

Friday, April 9th, 2010

Lecture title: Notes of an Alphabetical Fetishist: Lettered in Rome

Place: Butler Library Room 523, Rare Book and Manuscript Library, 535 West 114th St.
New York, NY 10027

Date: April 20 at 6:00 p.m.

From the Columbia Rare Book & Manuscript Library:

Russell Maret will discuss his recent alphabetical investigations and experiments conducted while a fellow of the American Academy in Rome. Russell’s initial intention in Rome was to document and analyze lettering in the catacombs. Upon arrival, however, he was quickly diverted by the great variety of classical lettering styles; and what began as an inquiry into non-Imperial lettering developed into a more playful study of diverse alphabetical “themes.” Join Russell for a tour of what he found in Rome and what he made as a result.

— Paul Razzell

Russell Maret and Notes of an Alphabetical Fetishist

Tuesday, September 29th, 2009
http://fpba.com/blog/?p=748
As many of you know from reading this blog, Russell Maret has won this year’s Rome Prize in Design, an endowed residency awarded each year to fifteen emerging artists to ‘refine their artistic aptitudes’ while living at the American Academy on the Janiculum, Rome’s highest hill. Maret will document and map all of the in situ lettering in the accessible roman catacombs and will evaluate the variant lettering styles he finds there. His project, The Subterranean Antique Letter, will be documented in a forthcoming monograph as part of his series of books titled Swan & Hoop.
While we look forward to this book, we can follow Russell’s Roman experiences in a new blog called Notes of an Alphbetical Fetishist. The first installment traces Russell’s first walk from the Janiculum to the catacombs and is an evocative record of his many impressions of the complexity of the place:
‘It is disorienting traveling through Rome. Sight, sound, space, and time occur at continually alternating paces and scales: the tearing sound of Vespas punctuating the slow trickle of fountains; the exuberant plan of monumental space surrounded by crowded, spider-veined streets; the incessant kaleidoscope of the antique, medieval, baroque, and modern; the collusion of the urban and the rural. Very simply: there are no straight lines here. As if to prove this point, I chose a circuitous route for our first walk to the catacombs.’
If you heard echoes of Lawrence Durrell in these lines, you aren’t the only one. Be sure to bookmark Notes of an Alphbetical Fetishist (or subscribe to the blog’s RSS feed) and look forward to The Subterranean Antique Letter.

Philocalus

As many of you know from reading this blog, Russell Maret has won this year’s Rome Prize in Design, an endowed residency awarded each year to fifteen emerging artists to ‘refine their artistic aptitudes’ while living at the American Academy on the Janiculum, Rome’s highest hill. Maret will document and map all of the in situ lettering in the accessible roman catacombs and will evaluate the variant lettering styles he finds there. His project, The Subterranean Antique Letter, will be documented in a forthcoming monograph as part of his series of books titled Swan & Hoop.

While we look forward to this book, we can follow Russell’s Roman experiences in a new blog called Notes of an Alphbetical Fetishist. The first installment traces Russell’s first walk from the Janiculum to the catacombs and is an evocative record of his many impressions of the complexity of the place:

‘It is disorienting traveling through Rome. Sight, sound, space, and time occur at continually alternating paces and scales: the tearing sound of Vespas punctuating the slow trickle of fountains; the exuberant plan of monumental space surrounded by crowded, spider-veined streets; the incessant kaleidoscope of the antique, medieval, baroque, and modern; the collusion of the urban and the rural. Very simply: there are no straight lines here. As if to prove this point, I chose a circuitous route for our first walk to the catacombs.’

If you heard echoes of Lawrence Durrell in these lines, you aren’t the only one. Be sure to bookmark Notes of an Alphbetical Fetishist (or subscribe to the blog’s RSS feed) and look forward to The Subterranean Antique Letter.

Above: Russell in front of the Damasian inscription.

— Paul Razzell

Russell Maret and Æthelwold

Monday, April 6th, 2009

pv_pg01

For those interested in following the development of a fine press book from concept to completion, check out Russell Maret’s blog. His latest posts have to do with his forthcoming book, Æthelwold. For this book, Russell is designing his own type, designing the book, producing all of the illustrations and taking care of the printing. The blog offers a fascinating look into the many decisions and interim successes on the way to producing a finished book. His latest post describes printing the first pages of the book in his new type:

“On Thursday I printed the first two pages of the Pervigilium Veneris (one each of Latin and English) in my new Cancalleresca Milanese type. Printing a bilingual text presents many challenges to the typographer, the greatest of which is whether to pursue a feeling of typographic equanimity or to emphasize the differences between the two texts. In the case of the PV, the solution to this problem was aided by Bruce Whiteman’s approach to the translation. Rather than producing a symmetrical syllabic rendering of the Latin, Bruce (thankfully) chose to set the English to his own music. The resulting translation is nearly twice as many lines as the original Latin. One of the pitfalls of using a Cancalleresca Corsiva type (like my Milanese) is that it tends to visually break up when freighted with too much white space. The ascenders and descenders need to be close to their kind or they hang on the page like forlorn tendrils, disconnected and exposed. If I were to set both the Latin and the English in upper and lower case, the Latin would not hold its own on the page but be subsummed by the empty chasms separating stanzas. As a solution I chose to set the Latin in all caps and the English in upper and lower case. The Latin stakes out its territory with a horizontal epigraphic presence while the English is allowed to flow in a more vertical thread.”

AND: If you’re lucky enough to be in Los Angeles May 3rd, Russell is giving a free public lecture called ‘Letter Forms as Content.’ Let’s hope some clever person records the presentation and distributes it as a podcast for unfortunates like myself who won’t be able to attend.

Where and when: Sunday, May 3, 2009. 2:00 – 5:00pm at the William Andrews Clark Memorial Library, 2520 Cimmaron Street, Los Angeles, CA.

Russellophiles can look forward to reading his illustrated article ‘Drawing with Smoke,’ which will be featured in the fall 2009 issue of Parenthesis. And Russell’s latest book, Mediaeval in Padua, will be reviewed by Robert Bringhurst in the same issue. Parenthesis is published twice a year and is free to members of the FPBA. Not an FPBA member? Click here.

— Paul Razzell