Posts Tagged ‘Jason Dewinetz’

The private-press spirit in a nutshell

Wednesday, May 19th, 2010

“I decided simply to publish an edition, if for no other reason than that I would then have a copy myself.”

This quote, from Jason Dewinetz of Greenboathouse Press, really sums up the private-press spirit. The edition Jason is referring to is Felice Feliciano’s Alphabetum Romanum, “an instructional treatise on the correct rendering of Roman capital letters, written by Feliciano in 1463.” Jason is redrawing Feliciano’s letters from scratch, and will issue a new edition of the work in the (hopefully) not-too-distant future. You can learn more about Jason’s work on the Alphabetum Romanum and other Greenboathouse Press projects on his blog.

Above: A page from the original 1463 manuscript (left), the 1960 Officina Bodoni edition (centre) and a working drawing for the Greenboathouse Press edition (right).

—Paul Razzell

Jim Rimmer’s typefoundry finds a new home

Tuesday, April 27th, 2010

This past Sunday several hundred people gathered at Simon Fraser University in Vancouver to celebrate the memory of Jim Rimmer, typographer, typefounder, printer, and graphic artist.

Since Jim’s passing in January of this year, many people in the printing, typography, and fine press communities have been worried — and with good reason — that Jim’s typefounding and casting knowledge would pass on with him.

It was an exciting moment, then, when the young and energetic Jason Dewinetz of Greenboathouse Press announced in his eulogy that much of Jim’s typefounding and printing equipment will not be moved to a museum or university archive. Instead, Jason has arranged to purchase this equipment from the Rimmer family and move it to Vernon, B.C., where it will continue to be used in the production of finely printed books. We couldn’t hope for a better home for this equipment.

Jason’s announcement was a relief to many, just as it was a relief to learn several years ago that Richard Kegler of P22 Typefoundry had purchased the rights to distribute Jim’s digital font library, thereby relieving Jim of the task of promoting his own work—something Jim seemed constitutionally unable to do.

It is great to see Jim’s legacy passed on in such a tangible way.

Two documentaries about Jim Rimmer in the works:

Many of you already know that Richard Kegler is finishing work on a documentary film about Jim Rimmer called Making Faces: A Documentary on Cutting Metal Type. See http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ph0ooDzD4ZQ&feature=player_embedded.

There is another Rimmer documentary in the works: Ryan Mah, who apprenticed with Jim, filmed Jim at work every Sunday for three years. This footage is now being edited and From Lead to Gold: A Portrait of Jim Rimmer will appear this fall. You can watch the trailer here: http://www.fromleadtogold.com/clips.html

Rimmer from Ryan Mah on Vimeo.

We’ll report on both of these films when they are released.

— Paul Razzell