Archive for the ‘Russell Maret’ Category

Russell Maret’s Kickstarter Campaign: Casting and Engraving New Typefaces

Tuesday, February 14th, 2012

 

This is exciting: FPBA member Russell Maret has launched a Kickstarter campaign to raise US $25,000 to enable the Dale Guild Typefoundry to engrave and cast in metal a new proprietary type family designed by Russell himself.

There are several reasons you should support Russell’s Kickstarter campaign:

  1.  The books Russell will produce with this type will be — if his previous books are any indication — marvellously rich, intelligent, and beautiful.
  2. Your contribution will perpetuate a craft that has changed remarkably little since Gutenberg’s day and will enable relevant books to be printed and published with types of our own time rather than with types from an earlier era.Your contribution will help keep the private press book relevant to our own time.
  3. Your contribution will benefit YOU in a material way: Russell is thanking backers with his own broadsides and books. (As someone fortunate enough to own a couple of Russell’s works, trust me: they are worth having!)

Go have a close look at his Kickstarter campaign and watch his video appeal. This is a worthwhile and important project and one that deserves your support.

— Paul Razzell

Awards announced at Oxford fair

Sunday, November 6th, 2011

Russell Maret, right, with Annie Schlecter


Five presses and one illustrator won awards at the Oxford Fine Press Book Fair on Sunday, November 6, 2011. The five presses to receive Judges’ Choice awards were –Nikodim Press (Dimitry Sayenko, St. Petersburg, Russia), for the ABC of Fears; –Russell Maret (New York City), for Specimens of alphabets designed or revived by Russell Maret; –Susan Allix (London), for Myth; –Barbarian Press (Crispin and Jan Elsted, Mission, British Columbia, Canada), for Pericles; and –Whittington Press (John and Rosalind Randle, Leominster, Herfordshire, UK), for A Vision of Order. The Parrot Prize for best illustration in any medium went to Angela Barrett for her illustrations in the Hand and Eye Editions (London) version of The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde.

Additional random photos from the fair can be seen on the FPBA Facebook page. If you’re not on Facebook, just click here.

–Bob McCamant

Russell Maret at Codex 2011

Thursday, February 24th, 2011

At the Codex Book Fair in Berkeley this month, Russell Maret and photographer Annie Schlechter show Æthelwold Etc.(2011), and Prometheus Bound (2007), the tragedy of Aeschylus translated by Henri David Thoreau with smoke drawings by Maret.

A Roman Inscription on Santi Giovanni e Paolo al Celio (2010) by Maret, with photographs by Schlechter.

Maret, a self-described “alphabetical fetishist,” shows pages from his newest book,  Æthelwold Etc. at Codex.

russellmaret.com

russellmaret.blogspot.com

annieschlechter.com

~Suzanne Ahearne

Russell Maret elected new NA FPBA Chair

Thursday, September 30th, 2010

RussellMaret
Russell Maret explains something on the Codex 2009 show floor.

At a telephone meeting held on September 25, the North American board of directors selected Russell Maret for a new 3-year term as Chair. He will serve until 2013, and replaces Robert McCamant, whose term is expiring.

In addition, the board elected McCamant as Treasurer and Bob Baris and Spencer Timm as new board members. Previous officer David Moyer opted to renew as Recording Secretary, while Stephen Heaver and Mark McMurray renewed as board members. Sean Donnelly remains until 2012 as Membership Secretary, and additional board members with their year of term expiration include Jeffrey Cooper ’11, Robert Fleck ’11, Lee Harrer ’11, Peter Koch ’12, Michael McGarvey ’12, L.D. Mitchell ’12, Abigail Rorer ’12, Katherine Ruffin ’11, Michael Russem ’12, Wilbur “Chip” Schilling ’12, and Jane Siegel ’12.

Oak Knoll Fest Schedule Posted

Tuesday, July 20th, 2010

Oak Knoll has now placed the full schedule for its fall Fest, to be held October 1 through 3 in New Castle, Delaware, on its web site.
Highlights include:
–Talks by Alexander Campos and Sarah Nicholls of The Center for Book Arts in New York, Martyn Ould of The Old School Press in Bath, England, and Russell Maret, printer from New York City.
–A reprise of the Friday Symposium (pre-registration required), this time on the topic of “Artists’ Books – Press Books: Siblings or Distant Cousins?” featuring panelists Alexander Campos, Duke Collier, Mark Samuels Lasner, Timothy Murray, Martyn Ould, and Jane Siegel. Many credit the previous symposium with increasing interest among special collections librarians and private collectors.
–A huge book fair with more than 40 exhibitors from around the US, the UK, Canada, and France.
Remember, FPBA’ers: the FPBA annual membership meeting will take place Sunday morning at 10:30 am, and will feature the talk by Russell Maret.
–Bob McCamant

Russell Maret, FPBA Annual Meeting, October 3

Friday, June 11th, 2010

The FPBA announces that its annual meeting will be held Sunday morning, October 3, during Oak Knoll Fest in New Castle, Delaware. In addition to a brief business meeting, the featured speaker will be Russell Maret, talking on “Visionaries & Fanatics: Thoughts on Type Design and the Private Press.” He will discuss his recent investigations (in Rome) into letter design and historical recurrence and how they relate to private press publishing in the early 20th and 21st centuries.

This scene is from his Open Studio at the end of his sojourn in Rome.
–Bob McCamant

Russell Maret presents the fruits of his Roman alphabetical investigations

Friday, April 9th, 2010

Lecture title: Notes of an Alphabetical Fetishist: Lettered in Rome

Place: Butler Library Room 523, Rare Book and Manuscript Library, 535 West 114th St.
New York, NY 10027

Date: April 20 at 6:00 p.m.

From the Columbia Rare Book & Manuscript Library:

Russell Maret will discuss his recent alphabetical investigations and experiments conducted while a fellow of the American Academy in Rome. Russell’s initial intention in Rome was to document and analyze lettering in the catacombs. Upon arrival, however, he was quickly diverted by the great variety of classical lettering styles; and what began as an inquiry into non-Imperial lettering developed into a more playful study of diverse alphabetical “themes.” Join Russell for a tour of what he found in Rome and what he made as a result.

— Paul Razzell

The 2009 Oxford Fine Press Book Fair

Monday, November 16th, 2009

Awards Given at the 2009 Oxford Fine Press Book FairAmong the many highlights of this year’s Oxford Fine Press Book Fair were the Judges Choice Awards for best books in show and the Gregynog Prize for the finest letterpress book.The Judges for the Judges Choice Awards were Jerry Cinamon, Dennis Hall, and Sebastian Carter, and the five awards went to the following presses (listed in alphabetical order:Circle Press for The Burning of the Books, with Ron King’s wonderful gravure printsRussell Maret’s amazing tour de force of letterpress colour work, Aethelwold, EtcParvenu Press for Carolyn Trant’s haunting take on the fairy story, And other Fairy TalesShirley Sharoff for her extraordinary book construction The Waves; andWhittington Press for Portmeirion, in which Leslie Gerry’s digital prints show how electronic printing can become an autograph medium.Each press received a certificate specially inscribed by the calligrapher Andy Moore.The Gregynog Prize was awards to Abigail Rorer of the Lone Oak Press for her Mimpish Squinnies, a collection of colour wood engravings showing unusual botanical prints. The judges were David Butcher, Gaylord Schanilec, and David Vickers. Abigial received a prize of £500.Thanks to Sebastian Carter for notes on the prizes. A full report of the 2009 Oxford Fine Press Book Fair will appear in the Spring 2010 issue of Parenthesis.

The biennial Oxford Fine Press Book Fair is a must-see exhibition of fine press books from around the world. Over sixty presses from the UK, France, The Netherlands, Germany, Russia, USA, Canada, exhibit their work plus specialist book dealers and trade stands will make this the usual not-to-be-missed weekend.
This year’s programme of lectures included Ian Rogerson  discussing developments on printing colour up to 1939, Peter Lawrence and Simon Brett reflecting on the 25th anniversary of the re-foundation of the Society of Wood Engravers), Jeremy Greenwood talked about the wood-engravings of Eric Ravilious, and Nicholas and Mary Parry  discussed their work at the Tern Press.
Among the many highlights of this year’s Oxford Fine Press Book Fair were the Judges Choice Awards for best books in show and the Gregynog Prize for the finest letterpress book.
The Judges for the Judges Choice Awards were Jerry Cinamon, Dennis Hall, and Sebastian Carter, and the five awards went to the following presses (listed in alphabetical order:
Circle Press for The Burning of the Books, with Ron King’s wonderful gravure prints
Russell Maret’s amazing tour de force of letterpress colour work, Aethelwold, Etc
Parvenu Press for Carolyn Trant’s haunting take on the fairy story, And other Fairy Tales
Shirley Sharoff for her extraordinary book construction The Waves; and
Whittington Press for Portmeirion, in which Leslie Gerry’s digital prints show how electronic printing can become an autograph medium.
Each press received a certificate specially inscribed by the calligrapher Andy Moore.
The Gregynog Prize was awards to Abigail Rorer of the Lone Oak Press for her Mimpish Squinnies, a collection of colour wood engravings showing unusual botanical prints. The judges were David Butcher, Gaylord Schanilec, and David Vickers. Abigial received a prize of £500.
Thanks to Sebastian Carter for notes on the prizes. A full report of the 2009 Oxford Fine Press Book Fair will appear in the Spring 2010 issue of Parenthesis.

busyoxford2009

The biennial Oxford Fine Press Book Fair is a must-see exhibition of fine press books from around the world. Over sixty presses from the UK, France, The Netherlands, Germany, Russia, USA, Canada, exhibit their work plus specialist book dealers and trade stands make this a not-to-be-missed weekend.

This year’s programme of lectures included Ian Rogerson  discussing developments on printing colour up to 1939, Peter Lawrence and Simon Brett reflecting on the 25th anniversary of the re-foundation of the Society of Wood Engravers), Jeremy Greenwood talked about the wood-engravings of Eric Ravilious, and Nicholas and Mary Parry  discussed their work at the Tern Press.

Among the many highlights of this year’s Oxford Fine Press Book Fair were the Judges Choice Awards for best books in show and the Gregynog Prize for the finest letterpress book.

The judges for the Judges Choice Awards were Jerry Cinamon, Dennis Hall, and Sebastian Carter, and the five awards went to the following presses (listed in alphabetical order:

  • Circle Press for The Burning of the Books, with Ron King’s wonderful gravure prints
  • Russell Maret’s amazing tour de force of letterpress colour work, Aethelwold, Etc
  • Parvenu Press for Carolyn Trant’s haunting take on the fairy story, And other Fairy Tales
  • Shirley Sharoff for her extraordinary book construction The Waves
  • Whittington Press for Portmeirion, in which Leslie Gerry’s digital prints show how electronic printing can become an autograph medium.

Here’s a few photos of the Judges Choice winners:

russell maret 2

Visitors visibly impressed with Russel Maret’s letterpress tour de force Aethelwold, Etc.

carolyn trant

Carolyn Trant’s And other Fairy Tales (Parvenu Press).

leslie gerry 2

Leslie Gerry and his vivid Portmeilion (Whittington Press). Each press received a certificate specially inscribed by the calligrapher Andy Moore.

abigail rorer 2

The Gregynog Prize was awards to Abigail Rorer of the Lone Oak Press (shown above with Leonard Seastone) for her Mimpish Squinnies, a collection of colour wood engravings showing unusual botanical specimens. The judges were David Butcher, Gaylord Schanilec, and David Vickers. Abigial received a prize of £500.

Thanks to Sebastian Carter and Martyn Ould for notes on the prizes. A full report of the 2009 Oxford Fine Press Book Fair will appear in the Spring 2010 issue of Parenthesis. To become a member of the Fine Press Book Association and receive a subscription to Parenthesis, click here.

— Paul Razzell

Russell Maret and Notes of an Alphabetical Fetishist

Tuesday, September 29th, 2009
http://fpba.com/blog/?p=748
As many of you know from reading this blog, Russell Maret has won this year’s Rome Prize in Design, an endowed residency awarded each year to fifteen emerging artists to ‘refine their artistic aptitudes’ while living at the American Academy on the Janiculum, Rome’s highest hill. Maret will document and map all of the in situ lettering in the accessible roman catacombs and will evaluate the variant lettering styles he finds there. His project, The Subterranean Antique Letter, will be documented in a forthcoming monograph as part of his series of books titled Swan & Hoop.
While we look forward to this book, we can follow Russell’s Roman experiences in a new blog called Notes of an Alphbetical Fetishist. The first installment traces Russell’s first walk from the Janiculum to the catacombs and is an evocative record of his many impressions of the complexity of the place:
‘It is disorienting traveling through Rome. Sight, sound, space, and time occur at continually alternating paces and scales: the tearing sound of Vespas punctuating the slow trickle of fountains; the exuberant plan of monumental space surrounded by crowded, spider-veined streets; the incessant kaleidoscope of the antique, medieval, baroque, and modern; the collusion of the urban and the rural. Very simply: there are no straight lines here. As if to prove this point, I chose a circuitous route for our first walk to the catacombs.’
If you heard echoes of Lawrence Durrell in these lines, you aren’t the only one. Be sure to bookmark Notes of an Alphbetical Fetishist (or subscribe to the blog’s RSS feed) and look forward to The Subterranean Antique Letter.

Philocalus

As many of you know from reading this blog, Russell Maret has won this year’s Rome Prize in Design, an endowed residency awarded each year to fifteen emerging artists to ‘refine their artistic aptitudes’ while living at the American Academy on the Janiculum, Rome’s highest hill. Maret will document and map all of the in situ lettering in the accessible roman catacombs and will evaluate the variant lettering styles he finds there. His project, The Subterranean Antique Letter, will be documented in a forthcoming monograph as part of his series of books titled Swan & Hoop.

While we look forward to this book, we can follow Russell’s Roman experiences in a new blog called Notes of an Alphbetical Fetishist. The first installment traces Russell’s first walk from the Janiculum to the catacombs and is an evocative record of his many impressions of the complexity of the place:

‘It is disorienting traveling through Rome. Sight, sound, space, and time occur at continually alternating paces and scales: the tearing sound of Vespas punctuating the slow trickle of fountains; the exuberant plan of monumental space surrounded by crowded, spider-veined streets; the incessant kaleidoscope of the antique, medieval, baroque, and modern; the collusion of the urban and the rural. Very simply: there are no straight lines here. As if to prove this point, I chose a circuitous route for our first walk to the catacombs.’

If you heard echoes of Lawrence Durrell in these lines, you aren’t the only one. Be sure to bookmark Notes of an Alphbetical Fetishist (or subscribe to the blog’s RSS feed) and look forward to The Subterranean Antique Letter.

Above: Russell in front of the Damasian inscription.

— Paul Razzell

Rolland Rome Prize to Russell Maret

Thursday, May 28th, 2009

It has been a busy spring for FPBA member Russell Maret. Not only did he give a show and tell on “Letter Forms as Content” as part of the Society of Scribes’ 2009 annual meeting, co-sponsored by APHA-New York and the Type Directors Club on Februrary 26, but he also talked to the Southern California chapter of APHA about his recent book projects on May 3, 2009. The Chapter co-sponsored the lecture with the William Andrews Clark Library, where the talk was held.

But the real news, which he has not been publicizing, is that on April 16 he was named one of two design recipients of the Rome Prize, swanimagesponsored by the American Academy in Rome. They honored him for “The Subterranean Antique Letter,” which I have to assume has to do with his attempts to recover letter forms in Padua and Lucca. The former has led to a finished book, and the latter to a forthcoming one. His web site: www.russellmaret.com

–Bob McCamant